Call 315.637.0605   Rev. Heath Can Help!

Hi! I am Michael Heath and this is the Pine Ridge Pastoral Counseling Web Page. Pine Ridge is a place for folks who are looking for the best mental health care but who are turned off by large clinics or impersonal facilities.

Since 1994, Pine Ridge has offered a distinctive and more personal alternative for mental health needs while providing a comprehensive range of psychological services to help individuals, couples and families deal with a wide range of emotional, relational, crisis related, life phase and spiritual problems.

Since I am both a state Licensed Psychotherapist and a nationally Certified Pastoral Counselor, I offer a comprehensive therapeutic approach which can relate to both the psychological and spiritual dimensions of life's difficulties .

This web site is a great place to learn about my areas of expertise and to find answers to questions you may have concerning psychotherapy, marriage counseling, couples counseling, and other counseling related issues. If you can't find what you're looking for, please contact me and I'll be glad to help.

Serving the people of Central New York since 1978!

Coping with the Absurd and the Horrifying Stories in the News

 

The tragedy of the Orlando massacre has shaken America's soul and left many wondering why such atrocities continue to happen .  Many people who are otherwise mentally healthy report experiencing increased anxiety and fear for no particular or obvious reason.  If you are one of those folks or just someone doesn't know how to respond or cope when disaster strikes, here are some helpful tips for navigating distressed emotions in the wake of a calamity:

1) Understand that feeling stress in the aftermath of a disaster is normal. Our minds are not designed to cope with such outrageous events and we all are vulnerable to exaggerated fears and panic. Feeling temporarily out of control or being overwhelmed with sadness or anger is not unusual.

 

2) There is no normal or correct way to feel.  People react in a variety of ways. Some get angry. Some get depressed. Some become numb. Some people withdraw. The way a person reacts is, to a large  extent,  determined by previous life experiences and his or her particular genetic makeup and vulnerability to shock.

 

3) If you are experiencing symptoms such as increased anxiety or irritability or feel detached from your surroundings, or have trouble sleeping,  don't ignore the changes.  Write down what you can observe in a private journal or talk about it with a friend.  If writing or talking doesn't seem to help and your distress is really interfering with your daily life, call your doctor.

 

4) Although news coverage is ubiquitous, it is important to limit your exposure to the media and its coverage of such horrible events.  Watching reports can increase your discomfort while avoiding the programing can help reduce the intensity of your distress.

 

5)  Ask yourself what is most upsetting about any news report that causes your distress. Be specific and ask yourself if you have ever felt that way before in the past.   Many times contemporaneous issues can connect with unhealed wounds from the past and generate intensely dysphoric experiences which are exaggerated and out of proportion to the actual stimulus.  Being able to identify the antecedents can help you to factor out and focus on the present issue which can greatly reduce your sense of being overwhelmed.  

 

6) Take an emotional helicopter ride.  A powerful way to lessen the aftershock of tragic news is to change perspective and to get "above" it all.    For example an airline crash is a terrible occurrence but when one realizes that crashes are very rare, this change of view point can help quiet our fears and calm our anxiety.  Looking at events from a different point of view allows you to place yourself at a distance from the immediacy of the event and thus reduce its impact.   Even though gun violence is a growing and serious threat which needs to be addressed, it doesn't happen every day and most of the time most of us are safe in our environment.  Asking how a given tragedy immediately affects you personally is a good way to calm exaggerated fears.

 

Even though tragic events are out of our control, these simple steps can help us to cope and regain a reasonable perspective more quickly as you get  through the ordeal.  As always, if problems persist, seek professional help. 

The Rev. Michael Heath   6 21 2016

(with acknowledgement to Getty photo)

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Do you have to be "crazy" to see a therapist ?

(With thanks to Dilbert creator Scott Adams)

What comes to mind when you hear the word crazy ?   It’s a term we hear or use every day.  For some, it’s just another word for being illogical  or irrational.  For others it is a scary pronouncement about a severe and unchangeable mental condition.  For some others it is an outdated and offensive way to reference psychological problems. This confusion reveals that it is time to update our assumptions about mental health and illness.   

     Although the word crazy originally meant something which was full of cracks, it has come to mean someone with a mental disorder.  And here is the problem: While it was a major step forward to see psychological problems as an illness  rather than a curse or state of demonic possession , we now recognize that the medical model of the time (i.e. which understood illness in black and white terms: either one was healthy or sick.)  was grossly misleading and inaccurate.

     Unfortunately, although our modern understanding of physical illness has progressed and we now understand health and illness as being on a continuum, our thoughts about psychiatric disorders lags behind.  Continuing to understand mental disorders as separate from normal experience not only distorts their reality but creates unnecessary fear and stigma. 

     Again, for many folks, mental illness raises grim 19th century images of insane asylums where untreatable patients were locked away from society in facilities which were much like prisons.  The notion of being crazy or insane meant that one was permanently deranged and radically different from a normal person.  Likewise, a stigma arose that anyone who saw a therapist meant that s/he must be crazy.

      It is important to understand that the distinction between being mentally healthy and  disordered are relative and not absolute .  And here is the thing which is vitally important to understand: No one is completely rational or logical, i.e. sane.  We all have distortions in our perceptions of our self and the world. Likewise, no one is completely healthy in the way they respond to the challenges of life.  We all have our irrational quirks, i.e . we all are a little bit crazy.

     The critical distinction between being healthy and disordered has to do with the relative impairment or disruption  a person’s distortion creates in his or her life.  Thus, to answer the original question, ( Do you have to be crazy to see a therapist?) it depends on what you mean by crazy.   If crazy means having an emotional problem, then, yes. People see counselors for specific reasons.  But, since we’re all a little bit crazy, seeing a therapist should be no different than going to the dentist.  It is a judgment call.  Each person decides if the irrational aspect of his/her life is intrusive/disabling enough to seek help.  

     On the other hand, if what it meant by  the word crazy is having a severe psychological problem, the answer is no.   Sometimes, I’m asked if it’s okay to use the word crazy and I think that it is.  I think we need to use it to mean those chunks of irrational behavior that we all have.  (e.g. When I saw the sale, I went crazy and bought three pairs of shoes.)  Even regarding more serious issues like becoming angry and “losing it” we need to understand that most mental problems are intermittent and treatable and  are not a permanent or untreatable condition which requires hospitalization.  

     If we can update our understanding of psychological disorders, we can take away the fear and stigma of them.   Mental health is not fundamentally different from physical health nor should attitudes regarding seeking help be any different than going to any other kind of doctor.

Rev. Michael Heath, LMHC, Fellow A.A.P.C.      6 5 2016  

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Sex in Marriage : Are You having Enough ?  

 

I'm not clear how many people are worried that they are not having enough sex but I do know from clinical experience that many tend become discouraged in their relationships and give up on sex . 

-- Research shows that folks who have sex at least once a week are happier than folks who don't. That is a correlative statistic, not a causal connection however.  It is not clear if having sex makes you happier or if happier people have more sex.

-- My concern is not with how much sex couples have but that sex is respected as an essential part of their relationship.  Like noted sex educator and Syracuse University professor Sol Gordon used to say, “Sex isn’t the most important thing in marriage but it’s in the top ten!”   

-- If couple has gone months without physical intimacy for no obvious reason (e.g. health problems or physical separation), this absence is a clinically important

symptom and could signal significant problems of either medical, psychological or relational nature.

-- It is unfortunate that because immature attitudes, many partners are embarrassed to talk about medical issues which involve sex. Ironically, there are effective treatments for most sexual dysfunction issues for both men and women.  Although publicity concerning Viagra like medications has helped many to get over the aversion to seeking medical help there are those who still avoid getting help and suffer unnecessarily.

--  In addition to physical disorders, anxiety and depression can also rob a person of passion and sexual interest. Likewise , normal emotions like anger and resentment can create obstacles in a relationship which can suppress libido and kill desire.  Rather than simply accepting the passionless situation, it is important for couples to know that  professional help can provide dramatic results and restore lost intimacy and joy.   

-- How often folks have sex varies a lot depending on many variables such as health, busy schedules, stress, etc. And … the amount of sex does not necessarily indicate the overall level of satisfaction in a marriage or in the sex itself.

-- That said, I think it is important for couples to acknowledge the importance of sex and make sure that sex does not get pushed aside because of overloaded schedules, stress or fatigue.

-- Although spontaneous encounters are great, the demands of work and family can make opportunities few and far between. Thus, couples need to become intentional about sex by blocking out time on their calendar and protecting those commitments. Planning romantic rendezvous is a good way to make sure that that the fire in your marriage will not dim or go out.

-- Some couples react to the idea of scheduling sex with skepticism, i.e. that isn't romantic. However those who are willing to try it report that not only is it very romantic but that the "dates" are something to look forward to with excitement and eager anticipation.       

Rev. Michael Heath LMHC, Fellow A.A.P.C.  5 18 2016

http://www.cnn.com/2016/04/11/health/sex-frequency-happiness-research/

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Watch Rev. Heath's Bridge Street Mental Health segments below:


June 21, 2016

Coping with the Absurd and the Horrifying Stories in the News

The tragedy of the Orlando massacre has shaken America's soul and left many wondering why such atrocities continue to happen .  Many people who are otherwise mentally healthy report experiencing increased anxiety and fear for no particular or obvious reason.  If you are one of those folks or just someone doesn't know how to respond or cope when disaster strikes, here are some helpful tips for navigating distressed emotions in the wake of a calamity:

1) Understand that feeling stress in the aftermath of a disaster is normal. Our minds are not designed to cope with such outrageous events and we all are vulnerable to exaggerated fears and panic. Feeling temporarily out of control or being overwhelmed with sadness or anger is not unusual.

2) There is no normal or correct way to feel.  People react in a variety of ways. Some get angry. Some get depressed. Some become numb. Some people withdraw. The way a person reacts is, to a large  extent,  determined by previous life experiences and his or her particular genetic makeup and vulnerability to shock.

3) If you are experiencing symptoms such as increased anxiety or irritability or feel detached from you…
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